September 28, 2022

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New society at Cape Breton University aims to build computer programming community

SYDNEY, N.S. — Three Cape Breton University students are hoping if they build up the coding community, computer science programming courses will follow.

Lefin Paruvaparampil Chacko, Anilkumar Varrier and Emaad Hazari hope their newly founded CBU Coders’ Society will create a community of people with programming interests which will demonstrate that there is an interest in computer science and programming at the university.

“(We hope to) emerge as a society of people who can develop the island through social media development or creation of a webpage,” said Chacko, who has seven years coding experience.

“We are also teaching how to program for beginners and experts are able to meet the delegates from different companies. Like for (a recent event) we had a guest speaker, Todd Graham, who is the operations manager for Navigate Start-Up in Sydney.”



Chacko, society president, has seven years experience in coding and society vice-president Varrier has 12. Hazari, a society executive member, has experience in the information technology field but not coding.

“Programming is the future,” Chacko said.

“It’s something you can do anywhere. Like a cafeteria or anywhere,” Varrier added.

Div Saini, left, waits for Midhun Paily to take a shot while playing carrom board, a popular game in India, last week at the start of the CBU Coders' Society second event. NICOLE SULLIVAN • CAPE BRETON POST  - Nicole Sullivan
Div Saini, left, waits for Midhun Paily to take a shot while playing carrom board, a popular game in India, last week at the start of the CBU Coders’ Society second event. NICOLE SULLIVAN • CAPE BRETON POST – Nicole Sullivan

Only two weeks old, the CBU Coders’ Society already has a couple of dozen members. Each meeting starts with time spent playing games before a guest speaker or activity rounds out the session.

“First, you need to relax before you code,” Chacko said.

The game time also gives students like Div Saini, Midhun Paily and Gishnu Pillai the opportunity to meet other people on campus.

“I was looking to meet more people interested in software development,” said Saini, who has a computer science degree from Michigan University.

“This society, I have been in (ones like this) before. They are fun to be a part of.”

Like the CBU Coders’ Society founders, Saini thinks Cape Breton University would benefit from adding more computer science and programming courses.

“I feel like they already have a few faculty educated in it who could teach it and have some computer science related programs already,” Saini said.

“A lot of what they have here already covers the basics so it would be good to have a computer science program here.”

To find out more about the CBU Coders’ Society, find them under that name on Facebook and Instagram.

Nicole Sullivan is a diversity/immigration and education reporter with the Cape Breton Post.